Seizing Crimea: Russians Tire As The War Comes Full Circle

Barry Gander
7 min readNov 23, 2022
A child who survived the Russian occupation of Kherson has a stare that should give Putin nightmares.

Bad news comes in three for premier Putin:

First, war has circled back to the Crimean peninsula as Ukrainian troops close in following a drive that threw back Russia’s invading troops.

Second, civilian willpower is crumbling — a secret poll reveals that Russians are tired of the war and do not feel optimistic about the future. Some territories have even called for a formal end to the fighting.

Third, in the face of this gale, a desperate Putin has had to call up another 700,000 conscripts to throw into the fight.

Where it all started: Russia’s “little green men” in anonymous uniforms captured Crimea in 2014.

The war really began when Russian troops wearing masks and devoid of insignia occupied key Crimean airports and military bases on March 18, 2014. They were acting on Putin’s direct orders.

This was followed by a guerrilla war on the mainland, with Russian troops infiltrating Ukrainian land, killing resistors and shooting down aircraft — including one instance of a passenger plane.

Now, Ukrainian soldiers are poised to retake Crimea, which would mean that the war will be all but over. Putin took Crimea for strategic reasons, and if he is denied the area, the entire Russian campaign will be recognized as a failed effort.

And Russia will revert to second-tier status as a military and economic power.

With the capture of Kherson and the rumoured footholds already established on the eastern riverbank, the Ukrainian forces are within striking distance of the North Crimea Canal. The two sides are battling fiercely in Nova Kakhovka, where the canal begins. Russian administrators have started to leave the city, foretelling a Ukrainian take-over.

If the Ukrainians control the canal, they would control the water supply to the arid Crimea peninsula. If Crimea becomes uninhabitable, Russia will have to find a new home for its Black Sea fleet, which it uses to project its power into the…

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Barry Gander

A Canadian from Connecticut: 2 strikes against me! I'm a top writer, looking for the Meaning under the headlines. Follow me on Mastodon @Barry